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October 02, 2017 11:34 AM UTC

Special Session Kicks Off With (Wait For It) GOP Bad Faith

  • 14 Comments
  • by: Colorado Pols

UPDATE #4: The editorial board of the Denver Post tears into Republicans for their actions today:

Colorado’s Republican lawmakers blew off responsibility on the first day of a special legislative session Monday, when three GOP lawmakers cast a spiteful, obstructionist vote to score political points and punish innocent government entities with small but significant erroneous budget cuts.

Clearly, the three Republican senators who cast that very vote on Monday, signaling the end to the October special session just as it began, don’t have an answer for their scorn-worthy actions.

As we wrote in this space on Friday, refusing to do their job isn’t going to have a happy ending for Colorado Republicans.

—–

UPDATE #3: Meanwhile, a more hopeful picture in the Colorado House as the SB17-267 fix passes its first committee with bipartisan support:

Good job, Rep. Dan Thurlow, but make sure somebody else taste-tests your dinner tonight.
—–

UPDATE #2: The first attempt in the Colorado Senate to fix SB17-267 dies in the Transportation Committee on a 3-2 party-line vote.

—–

UPDATE: In the interest of transparency, we’ve posted the full text of the draft bill from Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg to fix the SB17-267 glitch after the jump. Perhaps it will inspire more interested parties to question why exactly we can’t do this now…?

—–

Colorado Senate President Kevin Grantham.

As Joey Bunch of the news outlet formerly known as the Colorado Statesman reports, the Colorado House and Senate have gaveled in and are now starting the process of debating legislation to fix a drafting error in Senate Bill 17-267: an error costing special tax districts millions of dollars in uncollected tax revenue.

How far they get in that process, though, is anybody’s guess:

Colorado Senate Republicans said Monday morning, at the dawn of special session, they needed the extra three and half months before the next regular session to find a solution to fix a bill they helped mess up in the last regular session.

“There’s been a lot of controversy and firestorm about what’s getting ready to happen here today, and a lot of back of forth with the first floor, the governor’s office, whether we’re going to have a special session or not have one and what’s going to happen,” Senate President Kevin Grantham, R-Canon City, said Monday morning.

As of this writing the Senate Transportation Committee is hearing legislation to fix the error, so we’d say the question of whether “to have a special session or not” is moot. But the question remains wide open as to what the one-seat GOP Senate majority will allow to get through their chamber, if anything. Following up on our first report about a bill already in the works from GOP Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg for the 2018 regular session in January, reporter Marianne Goodland has Sonnenberg ignominiously walking back the whole thing:

Sonnenberg had been working on a draft bill intended to address the problem, but a bill he didn’t plan to introduce until next January. And Sonnenberg indicated Sunday the bill doesn’t address a growing concern over the constitutionality of the fix. The measure’s intent to restore revenue to special districts that were inadvertently stripped of those dollars is now raising questions whether voters will ultimately have to decide that issue…

But since he began working on that draft, Sonnenberg’s views on the constitutionality of the fix have changed. He told Colorado Politics that once the draft started circulating, legislative leaders started raising questions about whether the fix, which would restore tax revenue to those special districts, might be something voters will have to decide.

After Republicans came under pressure from activist groups like the Independence Institute and Americans for Prosperity-Colorado announced their displeasure with Gov. John Hickenlooper for calling the special session, Sen. Sonnenberg’s bill explicitly acknowledging the problem and showing the roadmap to a relatively easy fix became a serious political liability–not just for Sonnenberg, but every Republican groping for a reason to oppose the special session. So the screws got turned, and Sonnenberg appears to have lost his nerve.

The argument that voter approval is required to fix this error simply doesn’t hold water. On the matter of marijuana taxes, Colorado voters have weighed in three times in recent years–in 2012 with the passage of Amendment 64, and then twice more with Propositions AA and BB clarifying that yes, despite whatever faulty language in the original proposal that may not have fully complied with the byzantine 1992 Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights (TABOR), the people do want marijuana to be taxed.

Once you understand the details here, forcing special tax districts to wait for the legislature to convene in January–or worse yet, making them wait for a referred measure that likely wouldn’t come before next November–is a completely needless breakdown of functional government. In any practical messaging sense, this is a terrible predicament for Republicans to launch a defense of TABOR from. In this case, they are using an interpretation of TABOR so stilted that basically no one agrees with them except perhaps for TABOR’s convicted felon tax evader author Doug Bruce. And they are using it to do real harm, over what everyone agrees was an unintentional mistake.

Most observers we’ve talked to do believe legislation to fix this error would pass the Colorado Senate if it makes it to the floor. So as of now, the choice of whether the special session will be a further waste of money in an effort to fix an error that’s costing much more money rests with GOP Senate President Kevin Grantham.

Stay tuned for updates as they come in.

18-0156_02: Draft legislation to fix SB267 drafting error by Alva Adams on Scribd

Comments

14 thoughts on “Special Session Kicks Off With (Wait For It) GOP Bad Faith

    1. Nonsense. I'll bet if he and Randy Baumgartner walked into the Wrangler during beer bust of a Sunday afternoon, they'd be big hits with the leather crowd.

    1. Shame on Rep. Thurlow.  He failed Republican 101:  Have ZERO interest in governing and being productive.  Only legislate from the position of screwing over as many people as possible.  

      Thurlow did his job and that just can't stand.

      1. I'll be happy to contribute to the Thurlow re-election campaign if some stoopid rightie follows Moderatus' advice and tries to primary him.

  1. Evidently Dan Thurlow believes his campaign theme, "Let's do something different." Last year he won an award for supporting LGBT issues on the Western Slope. Less than a month ago, he hosted a Town Hall to discuss what is wrong with TABOR, severance taxes and the Gallagher Amendment. Today he voted for common sense. He still believes in small government–per his comments at the Town Hall. I'm pretty sure nobody is going to primary him, but you rabid right wingers can sure try. With open primaries I just might become an Independent just to vote for Dan. By the way, when he first ran, his opponent was Chris Kennedy, and they both ran campaigns based on facts and without rancor. Chris has announced he is running against Scott Tipton. I believe that Chris is the best chance we have to get Tipton out of the CD3 seat. How about checking him out? 

     

  2. After Dan Thurlow voted NO on 4 bad gun bills in 2015 (the first one he voted against was an asinine idea to make machine guns more readily available), RMGO claimed they were going to recall him.  Nothing happened.  Then when the 2016 election came around, no one even ran against him in either the primary or the general election!

    I don't agree with Rep. Thurlow on a number of items, but I do admire his willingness to stand for the voters in his district and not kowtow to the right wing bullies.

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