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April 04, 2023 10:28 AM UTC

Colorado's Two Largest Cities Move Closer to New Leadership

  • 1 Comments
  • by: Colorado Pols
Different kind of runoff

Denver and Colorado Springs are the two largest cities in Colorado, and today voters will take the first step in deciding who will lead their respective cities for the next 8-12 years. With so many candidates on the ballot — 16 in Denver and 12 in Colorado Springs — it’s likely that both races will go to a runoff election. If no candidate reaches 50% of the vote, the top two vote-getters will advance to the runoff (Denver on June 6, and Colorado Springs on May 16).

[REMEMBER: If you still have a ballot at home, DO NOT mail it. Ballots must be RECEIVED by your local clerk and recorder by 7:00 pm tonight. Click the following links for more information: Denver voting or Colorado Springs voting.]

We’ve been keeping a closer eye on the race for Denver Mayor, which is one of the most high-profile political jobs in the state. But the battle in Colorado Springs includes some familiar names, such as former Secretary of State Wayne Williams; 2016 Republican U.S. Senate nominee Darryl Glenn; and militia weirdo John Tiegen (who we still aren’t sure should even be eligible to run).

Heading into Election Day, voter turnout in Colorado Springs is at about 23%, while turnout in Denver has crept up to about 22%.

With all that in mind, let’s head to our own poll for one last prediction. If you’re still undecided in Denver, check out the latest episode of the Get More Smarter Podcast.

As always with our totally non-scientific polls, we want to know who you THINK is most likely to happen. We don’t want to know who you support or might prefer as a candidate — we want your informed political opinion to help us predict who is most likely to make the runoff election for Denver Mayor:

 

Who is MOST LIKELY to Make the Runoff Election for Denver Mayor?

View Results

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