CO-04 (Special Election) See Full Big Line

(R) Greg Lopez

(R) Trisha Calvarese

90%

10%

President (To Win Colorado) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Biden*

(R) Donald Trump

80%

20%↓

CO-01 (Denver) See Full Big Line

(D) Diana DeGette*

90%

CO-02 (Boulder-ish) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Neguse*

90%

CO-03 (West & Southern CO) See Full Big Line

(D) Adam Frisch

(R) Jeff Hurd

(R) Ron Hanks

40%

30%

20%

CO-04 (Northeast-ish Colorado) See Full Big Line

(R) Lauren Boebert

(R) Deborah Flora

(R) J. Sonnenberg

50%↑

15%

10%↓

CO-05 (Colorado Springs) See Full Big Line

(R) Dave Williams

(R) Jeff Crank

50%↓

50%↑

CO-06 (Aurora) See Full Big Line

(D) Jason Crow*

90%

CO-07 (Jefferson County) See Full Big Line

(D) Brittany Pettersen

85%↑

 

CO-08 (Northern Colo.) See Full Big Line

(D) Yadira Caraveo

(R) Gabe Evans

(R) Janak Joshi

60%↑

35%↓

30%↑

State Senate Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

80%

20%

State House Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

95%

5%

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
February 05, 2009 01:40 AM UTC

A future for high-speed passenger rail in Colorado?

  • 2 Comments
  • by: NeonNurse

Due to popular demand (WeatherDem, that means YOU!), I thought I would give a more detailed report on what I learned at the Rocky Mountain RootsCamp 2009 breakout session given by a representative of the Rocky Mountain Rail Authority. Whose name I foolishly did not write down. My bad.

Highly trained individuals

Basically, the RMRA is doing feasibility studies and data gathering on desirable train stops, potential passenger load, and physical terrain conditions.  This will all eventually become a “useful tool for lawmakers to take the next step” of approving the funding and giving the go-ahead for construction, possibly as soon as 2015.

Right now it looks like a likely starting place would be to create a direct rail line between DIA and downtown, because that is where the major interest for potential travelers currently lies.  Another possible priority is the I-25 corridor. Modern high speed rail requires limited curvature and low grades, which fits the landscape profile along I-25. (This is why existing freight rail lines won’t work for high speed rail.) It is also a region of potentially high interest to passenger traffic. The I-70 mountain corridor has high interest too, but that section of the line is going to be far more expensive to build, because much of it will either need to be elevated, or run through ten mile long tunnels through the mountains.

Mystery Science Trains 3000!

There are good reasons for getting started now on establishing high speed rail.  As Colorado’s population grows, so will the number of vehicles on the highways. Modern passenger trains can move a lot more people for a much lower cost in fuel and pollutants. Getting even some trains rolling will help us meet our goal of 20% less emissions by 2020. It is also the first step towards a nation-wide system of safe, clean and affordable public transportation, the new version of Eisenhower’s establishment of the interstate highway system in the 50s.

I say let’s get those shovels ready for workin’ on the railroad all the live long day!

Comments

2 thoughts on “A future for high-speed passenger rail in Colorado?

Leave a Comment

Recent Comments


Posts about

Donald Trump
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Lauren Boebert
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Yadira Caraveo
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado House
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado Senate
SEE MORE

65 readers online now

Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter to stay in the loop with regular updates!