CO-04 (Special Election) See Full Big Line

(R) Greg Lopez

(R) Trisha Calvarese

90%

10%

President (To Win Colorado) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Biden*

(R) Donald Trump

80%

20%↓

CO-01 (Denver) See Full Big Line

(D) Diana DeGette*

90%

CO-02 (Boulder-ish) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Neguse*

90%

CO-03 (West & Southern CO) See Full Big Line

(D) Adam Frisch

(R) Jeff Hurd

(R) Ron Hanks

40%

30%

20%

CO-04 (Northeast-ish Colorado) See Full Big Line

(R) Lauren Boebert

(R) Deborah Flora

(R) J. Sonnenberg

50%↑

15%

10%↓

CO-05 (Colorado Springs) See Full Big Line

(R) Dave Williams

(R) Jeff Crank

50%↓

50%↑

CO-06 (Aurora) See Full Big Line

(D) Jason Crow*

90%

CO-07 (Jefferson County) See Full Big Line

(D) Brittany Pettersen

85%↑

 

CO-08 (Northern Colo.) See Full Big Line

(D) Yadira Caraveo

(R) Gabe Evans

(R) Janak Joshi

60%↑

35%↓

30%↑

State Senate Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

80%

20%

State House Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

95%

5%

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
August 29, 2019 10:39 AM UTC

What's Next for Democrats Who Missed Debate Cut?

  • 9 Comments
  • by: Colorado Pols
Tom Steyer

The field of candidates for the next Democratic Presidential debate is set, with 10 hopefuls invited to the stage in Houston on September 12.

Several candidates who failed to meet the threshold to qualify for the Houston debate — 130,000 individual donors and a 2% polling average in at least four DNC-approved polls — have exited the race. New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand became the latest candidate to bow out on Wednesday.

Missing the September debate is a big blow for candidates such as Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet, but it isn’t necessarily a death knell for 2020 aspirations. For those candidates who remain in the race (as of today), who is the most likely to withstand the September shunning and continue to run a competitive campaign?

As always, we want to know what you THINK, not who you support or would prefer to see successful. Cast your vote after the jump below…

Which Democratic Candidate Has the Best Chance to Survive Missing Debate Cut?

Comments

9 thoughts on “What’s Next for Democrats Who Missed Debate Cut?

  1. Even at ten, the field is too large by half (and it’s still 6 months too early for “debates”) . . . 

    . . . what’s next?  

    More doors slamming into more backsides would be nice.

  2. I think Steyer is the only candidate with sufficient donors and anything close to 2% in enough polls that he's going to improve his status in the next month and be able to join the debate in October. 

    Reality bites (again) in a month.  At that point, there will be the next round of debate announcements AND a mandatory FEC filing of donors.  Those running on fumes will be noticed, and fundraising will be increasingly difficult (and increasingly needed).

      1. Starbucks guy Schultz has NO qualifying polls (over 2%, national or early state, since July 1), at this point.  And I don't recall how many donors he said he had, but I don't think it was 130,000.

  3. Those who wish to slog around Iowa and New Hampshire should be free to do so. Debates with 10 contenders are hardly enlightening and serve as fodder for political reporters, the cable networks and nuts-and-bolts junkies. The two early states have produced dark horses before.

     

    1. I can't think of any time since Carter in 1976 when Iowa and New Hampshire pushed a "dark horse" into "production."  When did either one push someone NOT in the top half of the field into the top 5 or so out of those two states?

Leave a Comment

Recent Comments


Posts about

Donald Trump
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Lauren Boebert
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Yadira Caraveo
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado House
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado Senate
SEE MORE

49 readers online now

Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter to stay in the loop with regular updates!