Forget EFCA, I’ll vote for the guy who fixes traffic at I-270 & Vasquez

I feel somewhat vindicated knowing that my daily commute includes one of the metro area’s 18 most congested intersections, this according to the Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/news…

Since moving to Stapleton three years ago, I have complained to my co-workers about a miserable stretch of I-270 and Vasquez I must commute each day, only to be countered with “yea, but you should have seen how f****ed up traffic was on the Turnpike going home yesterday..” or “think that’s bad, it took me three hours to take my kids up to Winter Park on Saturday for boarding..” Now my co-workers and I all have a list of bad commutes to compare around the water cooler, thanks to an official study by DRCOG.

Which lead me to think: DON’T OUR ELECTED OFFICIALS ALREADY KNOW WHERE THE TRAFFIC BOTTLENECKS ARE WITHOUT A DRCOG STUDY, AND SURELY THEY HAVE PLANS TO FIX IT! How wrong I am, as the Post story continues:

For seven of the 18 bottlenecks identified by DRCOG, CDOT has no plans to offer relief. At another six, environmental studies are in progress to identify future improvements, but there is no guaranteed source of funding.

So for 7 of the worst 18 traffic tie-ups in metro Denver-that’s more than 1/3 of the total–our state government has no plans to do anything about it, and for another 1/3, aside from an EIS in progress, no relief is in site.

Isn’t transportation planning and road building a basic public good our government should provide? Shouldn’t it be a core competency to which we hold accountable our elected officials?

Forget climate change, EFCA, cell phone use while driving, war profiteering by gubernatorial candidates, and how much a sacker at King Soopers should make-I want to know what my elected representatives will do about the basics– like fixing the roads.  

3 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. Car 31 says:

    Isn’t transportation planning and road building a basic public good our government should provide?

    Yes, but…

    it is much easier to complain about the roads than it is to fix them.  CO’s transportation infrastructure is in a piss poor condition.  However, when it costs millions of dollars to fix a mile of road, millions of dollars to fix a bridge and millions and millions of dollars to implement a transit plan….well, you get the gist.

    CO was able to leverage quite a bit of transportation funding from the feds this year and the General Assembly passed the FASTER bill – a significant piece of legislation.

    So as soon as CDOT gets a billion dollars of funding, they’ll be able to complete the backlog of projects already on the books, as well as respond to your concerns.

    Cheers…

  2. ardy39 says:

    to remedy traffic in Denver by not living there.

  3. DavidThi808 says:

    Say you fix all of them. You then get 18 new choke points. The root issue is that our transportation model will nor scale any further – we can’t make I-25 15 lanes in each direction.

    I don’t know what the answer is. Mass transit is not that efficient either as our density is too low throughout the area. But we have to figure out how to address this root issue of growing transportation needs and limited space for roadways.

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