Friday Open Thread

"Paranoia is just another word for ignorance."

–Hunter S. Thompson

40 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. Diogenesdemar says:

    Hmmmm . . . Let's see: . . . 

    First it was Kansas, then Texas, and the last week Wisconsin, and now Louisiana . . .

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/07/us/governors-tactics-at-center-of-louisiana-budget-vortex.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share

    Amid talk of Bobby Jindal’s presidential aspirations, questions have been raised about what caused a shortfall estimated to hit $1.6 billion next year.

     

    Hmmmm . . . 

     

    . . . anyone see a pattern developing here?????

  2. Diogenesdemar says:

    Just ask Tim Neville (or Orin Hatch), an unregulated free market in healthcare, with an assist from Wal-Mart — just what the (quack) doctor ordered:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/02/06/opinion/the-politics-of-fraudulent-dietary-supplements.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share

    Some of the country’s largest retailers, counting on the stupidity of consumers, are selling dietary-supplement junk, a step removed from sawdust.

    • Duke Cox says:

      While I agree wholeheartedly about the products named in the story, Dio, and the general gist of story, all supplements are not equal. My wife and I have been taking a juice powder supplement for 10 years and wouldn't think of not continuing to do so. The science of the efficacy of juice powder is pretty clear. It is simply food, juiced, and then dehydrated, encapsulated, and consumed. There is substantial scientific evidence in many peer-reviewed journals touting the benefit of fruits and vegetables. Fruit, berry, and vegetable powders, while hardly a panacea, are quite effective in boosting the immune system and lowering oxidative stress on the body. Multi-vitamin supplements, on the other hand, have been proven to discolor water and shrink the wallet…nothing else.

      This is not an ad…I am not selling anything…but I believe completely that the juice powders I have consumed over the past 3,600 days or so were fundamental to keeping me the healthy 63 yr. old that I am…I haven't had a vitamin tablet in over a decade.

      • Voyageur says:

        The key point of this scandal isn't even whether the supplements work but that in many, perhaps most, cases, the bottles don't actually contain the advertised products such as ginko balboa, etc.  I don;'t doubt the powders you use have some value but suspect it is less than if you age the fruits and vegetables fresh.  

      • Diogenesdemar says:

        I take several supplements myself, which I also believe are safe, and effective, and well worth their cost for me. My point is about the sanctimony and obscene foolishness of those cults of "unregulated free markets".

        (And the mendacity of self-servers aka Orin Hatch)

    • Duke Cox says:

      You disgust me…mission accomplished.

    • davebarnes says:

      AC,
      You are a moron.
      There is not an argument about relative differences among various forms of torture.
      The argument is about whether or not waterboarding is torture. (And, it is.)
      You are a double moron to try to argue that waterboarding someone at Gitmo would have prevented ISIS from burning a soldier alive.
      ,dave

      • Andrew Carnegie says:

        Dave,

        We are in a war, which some will not acknowledge, against an enemy who knows no limits to its cruelty.  It is not a state, although it claims to be.  It's fighters are not protected by the Geneva convention.

        I am not suggesting that waterboarding would have protected the Jordanian pilot from being ignited by his captors.  I am suggesting that the issue needs to migrate from the niceties of how much stress on an enemy taken in battle is too much, to how quickly we can exterminate the enemy.

        • FrankUnderwood says:

          And exactly who started that war, you moron? Your fearless leader, Bush, who lied about Sodom Hussein having weapons of mass destruction and ties to al Queda.  Al Queda wasn't in Iraq prior 2003.  It is now courtesy of your leader. 

          • Andrew Carnegie says:

            FU, that would be al Queda.

            While the first WTC attack was on Clinton's watch the second attack was on Bush's.

            Seems like Barach's al Queda is on the run stuff and ISIS is the JV stuff was somewhat optimistic.

            • FrankUnderwood says:

              So we are going back to the early '90's on this. Well let's take it one step further. I seem to recall your Great Leader, Ronald Wilson Reagan, referring to the Mujahadein in Afghanistan as freedom fights in the early and mid '80's when he was selling or giving weapons to bin Laden's people in their struggle against the godless communists.

              How did that work out, AC?

              • Conserv. Head Banger says:

                Trying to re-argue history is rather pointless. The USA ran guns and other supplies to Ho Chi Minh in 1943-45 becase he was fighting the Japanese. So what if Reagan gave guns to the Mujahadein? 

                • ajb says:

                  The mistaken belief that the enemy of our enemy is our friend isn't confined to one political party.

                • FrankUnderwood says:

                  Reagan laid the foundation for the build up of our enemies. And it wasn't just in Afghanistan. I still recall those photos of Reagan administration folk helpping prop up Sodom Hussein in the '80's since he was fighting a war with Iran.

                  As for me raising and re-arguing history, the worm (a/k/a Andrew Carnegie) is the one who wanted to go back 20 years and attribute blame to President Clinton. I simply suggest we look a little further back in history (there is, after all, no statute of limitations) and place responsibility where it really belongs…..on Ronald Reagan. 

                  Occasionally the enemy of my enemy is not my friend but simply another one of my enemies.

        • Early Worm says:

          What you fail to acknowledge is that there is a link between the atrocities committed by ISIS, and the torture perpetrated in our country's name. The torture and brutality committed by our enemies are justified (by them) as an appropriate response to the wrongs they perceive (in this case bombing them). It is a rationalization and an excuse and it is morally bankrupt.  Similarly, you justify and excuse the torture perpetrated by the CIA by posting pictures demonstrating how evil the enemy is.  Your logic, like theirs, is a rationalization and is morally bankrupt.  Torture is wrong. You do not defeat evil by becoming abandoning the high ground.

        • davebarnes says:

          We are not in a "war". Congress has not declared war.

          • FrankUnderwood says:

            Congress is incapable of voting to declare a war. The Senate can't even bring itself to approve funding for the Dept. of Homeland Security as demonstrated during the past three days.

            On the other hand, the House did vote earlier this week to repeal Obamacare for the 56th time.

  3. FrankUnderwood says:

    The worm has to post one of his disgusting pix of a human being being brutally murder (as a result of Bush’s invasion of Iraq) since domestic news is not going well for the wing nuts today. Unemployment down to 5.7% with another quarter million jobs added.

  4. saofner says:

    It would seem that there is a sockpuppet on Pols who would inflame us all by his childish links to photographs.  He seems to have forgotten US mob actions like this during Jim Crow and similar behavior by Americans agianst Native Americans here. Maybe a trip to Sand Creek or Ludlow would help in understanding.   It might be well for us all to note  that Jordan's King Abdullah took appropriate action in immediately authorizing the execution of terrorist agents convicted and condemned and in authorizing his air force to attack this remanent of Saddam Husein's power base whose tactics were similiar during the totality of his time in power.  In the real world, we face and address real issues not those generated by one who would create fear.  Go home little one, and hide under your bed.

    • slavdude says:

      this remanent of Saddam Husein’s power base

      I don’t think so. Saddam Hussein’s Iraq was one of the most secular societies in the Middle East, and they despised Al-Qaeda, of which ISIS is an offshoot too radical even for AQ.

      • Voyageur says:

        Saddam Husein had many faults, but being a pious Muslim was not one of them.   Still, while he expressed it crassly, I share AC's belief that in the kind of war — yes, undeclared, as if that is any solace to the victims burned alive, beheaded, and otherwise savagely killed — we are now waging cannot always be played by marquis of Queensbury rules.  In my Vietnam era service, I never left stateside.  But I had friends who were not so lucky.   My only question about waterboarding is pragmatic, not moral.  It seems to have accomplished little of value in return for the scorn it has caused to be heaped upon us.

        But I thank God (well, metaphorically, there being no such creature in reality) that we have had people in the military, the CIA, the NSA, etc. willing to do what is necessary to defend this country.   For every traitor like a Snowdon, we have been blessed with a Nathan Hale.  I know where my symphathies lie and it is not with those who give aid and comfort to our enemies in time of war. 

      • Voyageur says:

        Saddam Husein had many faults, but being a pious Muslim was not one of them.   Still, while he expressed it crassly, I share AC's belief that in the kind of war — yes, undeclared, as if that is any solace to the victims burned alive, beheaded, and otherwise savagely killed — we are now waging cannot always be played by marquis of Queensbury rules.  In my Vietnam era service, I never left stateside.  But I had friends who were not so lucky.   My only question about waterboarding is pragmatic, not moral.  It seems to have accomplished little of value in return for the scorn it has caused to be heaped upon us.

        But I thank God (well, metaphorically, there being no such creature in reality) that we have had people in the military, the CIA, the NSA, etc. willing to do what is necessary to defend this country.   For every traitor like a Snowdon, we have been blessed with a Nathan Hale.  I know where my symphathies lie and it is not with those who give aid and comfort to our enemies in time of war. 

        Pax vobiscum 

        • Voyageur says:

          paredon the almost double post.   This thing has been buggy about posting lately.

          • ajb says:

            V, from what I've been reading, it seems that terrorists commit atrocities to provoke an OVERreaction. As much as our conservative friends want to see boots on the ground in Syria (so long as it's not THEIR boots), history tells us it may not be the most productive strategy.

            • Voyageur says:

              Terrorists commit atrocities because that's what they do.  They don't hate us because of Guantanamo, they hate us because we let our women drive cars.   Kill them all and let Satan sort them out.

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