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March 25, 2014 02:22 PM UTC

Obama Indicates Action on NSA Spying; Udall Encouraged

  • 8 Comments
  • by: Colorado Pols

President Obama is preparing to act on the NSA spying controversy that has become a key issue for Sen. Mark Udall, who has been leading the charge for change. As CNN reports:

President Barack Obama and congressional leaders said Tuesday they will propose changes to the National Security Agency that would end its sweeping collection of bulk telephone records.

Sen. Mark Udall.
Sen. Mark Udall. Okay, that’s enough. Stop looking at him.

Obama told reporters in The Netherlands that he received from his intelligence team a "workable" option for NSA reform that he said would "eliminate" concerns about bulk data collection by the government…

…A senior administration official told CNN that the White House plan, first reported by the New York Times, would ensure "the government no longer collects or holds" the telephone records known as metadata — which includes the numbers and time of the call, but no content such as the actual conversation.

According to the official, the proposal "still ensures that the government has access to the information it needs to meet the national security needs" Obama identified in January when he outlined needed changes.

In a media release sent out today, Sen. Udall sounded an optimistic tone: "I will review the details of the president's proposal, but I am encouraged by reports that he has embraced my approach to ending the dragnet collection of Americans' private phone records. The Constitution is clear and Coloradans agree: the ongoing bulk collections of Americans' call records is an unacceptable invasion of our privacy that doesn't make us safer and must be brought to an end. I look forward to seeing the president's full proposal and continuing my work to defend the Bill of Rights and keep America secure."

Full press release after the jump.

Udall Welcomes Reports the President Will Heed His Call to End NSA Dragnet, Protect Constitutional Rights
 

Udall Has Led Bipartisan Effort to Confront NSA Overreaches, Reform Domestic Surveillance

 

Mark Udall, a member of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, released the following statement in response to reports that the president will support Udall's proposal to rein in the NSA's bulk phone records collection program:

"I will review the details of the president's proposal, but I am encouraged by reports that he has embraced my approach to ending the dragnet collection of Americans' private phone records. The Constitution is clear and Coloradans agree: the ongoing bulk collections of Americans' call records is an unacceptable invasion of our privacy that doesn't make us safer and must be brought to an end. I look forward to seeing the president's full proposal and continuing my work to defend the Bill of Rights and keep America secure."

Udall has been leading the bipartisan effort to rein in the NSA's domestic surveillance programs, protect Americans' privacy rights and ensure intelligence agencies are held accountable. Udall also has repeatedly pressed intelligence officials on the need to reform domestic surveillance programs and protect our constitutional right to privacy.

Comments

8 thoughts on “Obama Indicates Action on NSA Spying; Udall Encouraged

  1. Great solution.  Simply genius.  The way the govenment eliminates collecting and storing the metadata is it has the telcom company do it. Now it will be available to the govenment and others, not just the government.

    I will rest much easier now.

    Thanks so much for ensuring my privacy Senator Udall.

    1. Umm, in case you haven't noticed, the telecom companies have always been collecting this data for over 100 years.  Need proof?  You get one of those thingies every month itemizing your calls with all the charges, right?

       

        1. Listen up, Cowardly Troll.

          A law was passed in the 1970s that made it illegal for the federal government to collect data on U.S.citizens. After 9/11, the Bush administration justified a massive data collection purchase of info from phone companies and corporations of all sorts. They circumvented the law by buying it from private data mining firms instead of collecting it themselves. The key word is "buying"…lots o' cash involved.

          The program long sought by Admiral John Poindexter (the TIA or Total Information Awareness program) was finally realized.

          Read "No Place to Hide" by Robert O'Harrow Jr. I think you could use the education.

           

      1. While telephone companies have always maintained a certain amount of "meta data" and are collecting more now, it has always been voluntary and for the company's own private nefarious purposes. If you cared and took the time, you could research which company collected the least data, kept it the shortest amount of time,  and used it in the least objectionable way. Under Obama's proposal all companies would be mandated to maintain certain "meta data" to be available for the government. This is a small but significant change which I,  for one, find discomforting, particularly since the report of the President’s own commission found the the collection of this data did nothing to thwart terrorist atacks in the US.

        1. James, If the only difference in what is being now collected is who collects it for the goveernment and who stores it for the government, but it is still collected and stored, how has this changed things?  If anything it expands the people with access.  How has this protected our privacy?

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