Get More Smarter on Friday (June 25)

That went fast — today is the last Friday of June. Let’s Get More Smarter; if you think we missed something important, please include the link in the comments below (here’s a good example). If you are more of an audio learner, check out The Get More Smarter Podcast. And don’t forget to find us on Facebook and Twitter

 

CORONAVIRUS INFO…

*Colorado Coronavirus info:
CDPHE Coronavirus website 

*Daily Coronavirus numbers in Colorado:
http://covid19.colorado.gov

*How you can help in Colorado:
COVRN.com

*Locate a COVID-19 testing site in Colorado:
Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 

*Coloradans can now get a COVID-19 vaccine at one of six locations without a prior appointment. 

 

The search for survivors of a building collapse in Miami, Florida continues, with 159 people still unaccounted for. Among the missing is Cassandra Stratton, wife of longtime Colorado Democratic political consultant Michael Stratton.

Meanwhile, authorities continue to investigate the reasons behind the collapse of the condo building. As USA Today reports, it may very well be an issue related to a changing climate:

A Florida high-rise that collapsed early Thursday was determined to be on unstable land a year ago, according to a researcher at Florida International University.

The building, which was constructed in 1981, has been sinking at an alarming rate since the 1990s, according to a study in 2020 by Shimon Wdowinski, a professor in the Department of Earth and Environment.

When Wdowinski saw the news that the Champlain Towers South condominium in Surfside collapsed, he instantly remembered it from the study, he said.

“I looked at it this morning and said, ‘Oh my god.’ We did detect that,” he said.

Meanwhile, owners of units in the building have already filed a lawsuit against the Champlain Towers South condo complex association.

 

As The New York Times reports, the U.S. Justice Department is suing the State of Georgia over a new voting law:

“The rights of all eligible citizens to vote are the central pillars of our democracy,” Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a news conference at the Justice Department. “They are the rights from which all other rights ultimately flow.”

The lawsuit is among the highest-profile enforcement actions to be brought under the Voting Rights Act since the Supreme Court in 2013 gutted a key provision that allowed the Justice Department to stop states from passing laws viewed as facilitating voter discrimination.

The lawsuit shows that the Justice Department under the Biden administration intends to use the remaining tools it had to aggressively fight state actions that it sees as potentially disenfranchising minority voters. Mr. Garland vowed earlier this month that the department would deploy all of its available law enforcement options to combat voter discrimination.

The lawsuit comes days after congressional Republicans blocked the most ambitious federal voting rights legislation in a generation, dealing a blow to Democrats’ efforts to preserve voting rights. President Biden and Democratic leaders pledged to continue working to steer federal voting rights legislation into law.

 

Colorado’s Independent Redistricting Commissions will be touring the state in July and August to elicit feedback on potential new maps for 2022. The first look at a potential Congressional redistricting map came out this week, with an initial version of the legislative redistricting version due out on Monday.

Here’s what you need to know about the PRELIMINARY first map released this week. Justin Wingerter of The Denver Post has more on a first map that appears to be very favorable for Republicans.

 

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s request for a new trial in the killing of George Floyd was rejected by a judge. Chauvin is expected to be sentenced for his crimes today.

 

Vice President Kamala Harris is visiting the U.S.-Mexico border today. Republicans have long complained that Harris didn’t visit the border sooner so that she could…look at stuff, or something.

 

Click below to keep learning stuff…

 

And Now, More Words…

 

Succeeding in the modern Republican Party requires mastery of a special kind of crazy…one that even Rep. Lauren “Q*Bert” Boebert may not be able to fully demonstrate.

 

As the saying goes, you’re not being paranoid if they are REALLY out to get you.

 

As POLITICO reports, President Biden is basking in the glow of a big bipartisan victory on infrastructure:

Standing before the media on Thursday, the president basked in the limelight of a bipartisan infrastructure deal. It wasn’t just the specifics of the package that had him revved up. It was the way it had come together. The longtime creature of the Senate who has boasted endlessly about his mastery of the art of compromise now had proof that this seemingly antiquated form of governance could work.

“This is like the whole primary. People write off Biden and his style and they’ve done it for a long time now, and the guy keeps on winning,” said Greg Schultz, Biden’s former campaign manager. “That’s the part that is personal for Biden, he’s always believed that yeah, it’s broken but it doesn’t have to stay broken. It validates his brand of politics, his style of operating in D.C.”

Biden may not have long to celebrate, however. As Greg Sargent notes for The Washington Post, plenty of Congressional Republicans are still steaming mad that Biden might be close to accomplishing his big infrastructure plan. Congressional Republican leaders such as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell are pledging to torpedo the infrastructure deal in any manner possible.

 

Colorado Newsline reports on the advancement of a Congressional proposal to clean up toxic chemicals:

The U.S. House Energy and Commerce Committee has approved major bipartisan legislation that aims to reduce Americans’ exposure to toxic chemicals in air, water and consumer products.

The bill, the PFAS Action Act of 2021, led by Michigan Reps. Debbie Dingell, a Democrat and Fred Upton, a Republican, was approved 33-20 late Wednesday. It would tackle the contamination of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, by designating the chemicals as hazardous substances, which kick-starts federal cleanup standards.

 

Congressperson Lauren “Q*Bert” Boebert went on a right-wing radio show this week to utter falsehoods about Black Lives Matter being classified as a domestic terror group.

 

Here’s some new Colorado laws that you should be aware of:

Heavy air-polluters are now subject to real-time air quality monitoring.

Starting in 2022, Colorado will limit the ability to purchase high-potency marijuana products.

 

An ethics committee will look into a complaint about Republican State Sen. Bob Gardner.

 

The average life expectancy for Americans fell to its lowest level since WWII thanks in large part to the COVID-19 pandemic.

In related news, Colorado officials are scrambling to contain the rapid spread of the Delta COVID-19 variant in Mesa County. Officials in Aurora are also trying to figure out how to increase vaccination rates beyond the 50% mark.

 

 The Denver Post has more on an already-busy wildfire season in Colorado.

 

 A man who reportedly tried to intervene in a shooting in Olde Town Arvada earlier this week was likely shot and killed by a police officer.

 

Former President Trump has been removed from his cryostasis at Mar-a-lago and is preparing to venture out on a nationwide airing of grievances tour. From POLITICO:

Having spent months in semi-retirement after his election loss in 2020, Trump is set this weekend to kick off a series of political events. Aides and confidants say the goal is to boost his standing in anticipation of a possible future run and to scratch that never-soothed itch he has for publicity. But it’s also to exact some revenge.

On Saturday, Trump will hold a Make America Great Again rally outside Cleveland, Ohio in support of longtime aide-turned-Republican congressional candidate Max Miller, who is vying for the seat held by Rep. Anthony Gonzalez, a Cleveland native who voted for the second impeachment of Trump after the Jan. 6 riot on Capitol Hill.

Perhaps at some point Trump will figure out how to hold a rally against math, since that was the real culprit behind his 2020 defeat.

 

 

Say What, Now?

History definitely shows that millions of people are regularly killed by budgets [insert eyeroll here]:

 

 

 

Your Daily Dose Of ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ 

 

Axios breaks down what it calls “the great handshake debate.” Will fist bumps dominate your future interactions?

 

Fox News big shots Sean Hannity and Tucker Carlson are at war with each other.

 

 

ICYMI

 

► Former Colorado Senator Cory Gardner — the same guy who regularly sponsored legislation to prohibit Members of Congress from walking through the revolving door into lobbying — has himself decided to become a lobbyist. This is easily the least-surprising story of 2021 thus far.

 

► You can officially mark former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani off of your list of potential defense attorneys.

 

► Whatever you do, DO NOT MISS this week’s episode of The Get More Smarter Podcast, featuring a legislative session recap with House Speaker Alec Garnett:

 

Don’t forget to give Colorado Pols a thumbs up on Facebook and Twitter

 

5 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. MichaelBowman says:

    There is a great podcast produced by Scott Galloway (@profgalloway) that I think most here would enjoy. (Here’s the most recent in text form).  One of my favorite Gallaway quotes regarding American capitalists:

    “they’re capitalists in a bull market and socialists during times of economic challenge “.

    SPAC(e)

    People worried about starving or being eaten don’t have time to ponder the finite nature of life. But once we know we’re going to survive in the short-term, immortality begins to loom larger than mortality. Affairs, Teslas, and ayahuasca are the accessories of a life with more money than time. Now the billionaire class has taken midlife crises to a new level. In the past month, French billionaires alone have cut ribbons on: a $194 million art museum in Paris; a $175 million Frank Gehry-designed “creative campus” in Arles; and a nearly $900 million, 16-year renovation of La Samaritaine department store, complete with hotel, spa, and wavy glass facade.

    We do things bigger here in Texas, though.

    Last month, Jeff Bezos announced he would be aboard Blue Origin’s first manned space flight, scheduled for July 20. A recently divorced billionaire on human growth hormone transported into space in a giant dildo powered by an oxygen-rich rocket engine that produces 490 kilonewtons of thrust is ground zero for everything that is right and wrong with society. Mostly the latter. But I digress.

  2. MichaelBowman says:

    Borrowed from this morning’s The Big Stuff and slightly edited so we can attain a PG rating, not M (for mature audiences, being conscious that Moddy lurks here)

    Give us a second. Hang on. Just one more minute. Well damnit. Sorry. We’ve had an ear to ear smile since we heard about Doodie Pooliani’s law license yesterday, and it’s reached the point where we’re worried our faces are never going back to normal. We spent all day laughing our asses off and feeling like you do when you have to buy a birthday present for a rich friend. How do you embarrass the man who embarrasses himself every day? Let’s just do a little recap, shall we? Doodie was well known for accidentally butt-dialing Washington reporters. He was on a Borat movie with his hands down his pants in a hotel room. His running hair dye made it look like he was shitting out of his forehead. He held a press conference at Four Seasons Landscaping instead of the Four Seasons hotel. He sired a Gary Busey impersonator. He lost over and over and over again. Oh and HE USED TO HAVE SEX WITH HIS OWN COUSIN.

    Seriously, how are we supposed to embarrass this guy? We don’t know, but we pledge to keep trying. In the meantime, thanks Rudes. 

  3. Genghis says:

    Chauvin is expected to be sentenced for his crimes today.

    22.5 years, shorter than the max sentence for second degree murder (the most serious offense of which this piece of shit got convicted), but well over the presumptive sentence under Minnesota's sentencing guidelines.

    In other Minneapolis protect-and-serve news, it seems that five police officers praised as heroes in 2013 for taking down a crazed, violent black (of course) man who supposedly wrestled an automatic weapon away from one of the cops may have just straight up executed the guy.

  4. MartinMark says:

    So why would someone sue literally while the rubble still shifts and before there is any clue as to what happened?

    Is it to get first in line for damages, or first to market as the class action firm?

    If so, man that's perverse.

  5. MichaelBowman says:

    Who’s going to break it to #PewPew that our military declared climate change a threat multiplier during the Papa Bush era? Or put another way, since she was wearing diapers?  

    The Department of Defense has recognized the climate threat in National Defense Strategies and Quadrennial Defense Reviews since the George H.W. Bush Administration.

    These documents explain that climate change acts as an “accelerant of instability” and a “threat multiplier” in fragile political and security situations, and has created new security domains, where geopolitical rivals will compete for influence and control.  Climate change alone does not cause wars. But it contributes and exacerbates conditions of resource scarcity, economic and political instability that often lead to conflict. As a global power with strategic interests around the world, climate change is strategically important to the U.S. through the impacts it has on U.S. readiness at home and the regional stability of our allies abroad. 

     

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