Tuesday Open Thread

“Never use a big word when a little filthy one will do.”

–Johnny Carson

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12 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. Denver Yankee says:

    In response to an earlier question on this forum:

    Lisa Calderón and Penfield Tate have not only endorsed Jamie Giellis, but have agreed to work with her campaign in some capacity. (Denverite)
     

    “The press statement refers to the arrangement as a “unity ticket.” Calderón and Tate, who lost the May 7 general election that triggered a runoff between Giellis and Mayor Michael Hancock, will hold “events and conversations city-wide” to “continue the conversation for badly needed positive change.”

    Campaign spokeswoman Meghan Dougherty would not say precisely what a unity ticket entails, but said the arrangement is “more than an endorsement.” She would not comment on how the candidates would reconcile their differences.”

    • DavieDavie says:

      The #UNITEDENVER rally and newsconference today was well-covered by Denver media.  Calderon, Tate and Giellis have combined their not-that-different agendas, and as hoped, put aside differences to give a stronger voice to the 60% that have had it with Hancock.  

      After 8 years, Hancock has ridden the wave of the recovery, but lost track of why he was elected in the first place.  After letting developers run roughshod over neighborhoods,  lost track of hundreds of deed-restricted affordable homes, lost track of 1,100 acres of city-owned park land, and ignored the rising problem of homelessness (not to mention presiding over corruption in the convention expansion contract), he has offered too little, too late in response to his first real challenge in nearly 8 years in office.

      As one sign in the crowd said "TimesUpHancock"

      Hancock is justifiably worried, facing a unified opposition that received 50% more votes than his campaign.  Looking at Hancock's donor list and you'll see a Who's Who of companies with business before the Council and Mayor, companies and individuals that seek influence, and city employees whose jobs depend on the Mayor, etc.  It's gonna get ugly real fast.

  2. MADCO says:

    I understand bubbles and buying opportunities
    I don't understand the president.

    I had to go look it up – but it was Feb 2016 I started predicting President Trump. My reasoning was … unimportant. But yes, it assumed some not so nice things about voters and big money donors.

    But I don't understand
    Who profits when he blows up the farm debt?  Well- the new farm owners
    Who profits when he raises taxes? The uber rich.

    Who profits when he blows up the deficit?
    Is he- or anyone – really thinking they can debt finance enough prosperity that it pays for itself?  That generally only works in relatively grossly underdeveloped economies or hyperinflationary periods.

    I hope we are neither.
    The tarriff thing is weird. All the former R free traders are going along.. why?
    Why doesn't Rand Paul stand up and rail against the deficit, debt and trade wars? Why doesn't anyone?

    I don't understand who profits from raising taxes on Americans and blowing up the deficit.

    I've been thinking about Kareem Serageldin
    What would he say about the rising debt ratios?

    • PseudonymousPseudonymous says:

      One of the questions I think you're asking, since our deficit turns into debt, is "who profits from debt?"  Who do you think?  Got it in one– the rich.  We pay them interest for giving us money that we failed to extract from them in taxes to pay for things in the first place.

      • PseudonymousPseudonymous says:

        As far as who profits from spending.  The answer is, unsurprisingly, the people at whom the spending is targeted.  "Deficit" spending isn't a problem, in and of itself, but spending that targets the few (corporations like energy and defense folks) rather than people (social spending) reduces equity and creates an economy that generates prosperity for only a few.

        The problem isn't that Republicans are (and have always been) OK with spending.  The problem is who they spend that money on, and the price they try to extract– we have to raise taxes on regular folks/reduce social programs– for doing so.

  3. Duke CoxDuke Cox says:

    I think it may have something to do with an unholy alliance between the greedy and the holy.

    One group wants to hasten their rise to financial paradise on earth. God is a billionaire. Joel Osteen will tell you all about it. 

    The other group is hell-bent on bringing about Armageddon. It is teh Gayz fault. Check with Mike Pence on that.

    Of course, there is some crossover. Money laundering being a favorite pastime. Who, in the world, has more money than our assembled churches? The corporate criminals know that.

    If they lie about pedophelia and rape, they will lie about money, don'tcha think?

  4. PseudonymousPseudonymous says:

    A brief thread:

    This is how corporate lobbying works:

    Lobbyists ID bills they need to kill to keep profits high (no matter the human cost), come up w/ “sensible” talking points to mask intent + say policy is “misguided,” then schmooze policymakers in secret into accepting said talking points. https://t.co/EB9TDkANYj

    — Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) May 13, 2019

  5. Powerful PearPowerful Pear says:

    John Durham is coming! Be afraid, very afraid.

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