You’ve Come a Long Way, Colorado–Let’s Party

Among the many inaugural festivities to break out your black tie for (or your “dressy Western,” this being Colorado), here is one that even if you don’t get to attend, every Coloradan should be proud to know is happening:

One Colorado Executive Director Daniel Ramos:

“As the state’s leading advocacy organization for LGBTQ Coloradans and their families, it’s important we recognize Colorado’s contributions to the history of the LGBTQ community, including the election of Colorado’s first openly gay Governor, Jared Polis. The story of Colorado from the Hate State to the Great State is a recognition of early investments from the Gill Foundation; expanding protections for LGBTQ Coloradans in areas of housing, employment, and public accommodations; protecting LGBTQ youth from bullying in Colorado schools; and ensuring transgender Coloradans can access identity documents that match who they are. Our work continues to improve the lives of LGBTQ Coloradans and their families. So for this night, we will honor the work of those who paved this path before us, celebrate this historic occasion of our country’s first gay governor, and then get back to work ensuring a more fair and just Colorado for all.”

Special guests will include:

The Honorable Barney Frank, the first gay member of Congress to come out voluntarily.

Melissa Etheridge, an Academy Award and Oscar Award winning singer-songwriter and gay rights activist.

David Mullins and Charlie Craig, the plaintiffs from the Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission Supreme Court case.

Of all the inaugural wing-wings scheduled for the second week of January in addition to the main event, here’s one more that could draw out some truly big nationwide stars in addition to headlining LGBTQ royalty. Gov.-elect Jared Polis was already bicoastal A-Lister before being elected Colorado’s chief executive, and the historic moment his inauguration represents makes it an occasion for a party like Denver perhaps hasn’t seen since hosting the Democratic National Convention in 2008.

And when you reflect back on history a quarter century to 1992, the year both an unconstitutional constitutional amendment sanctioning discrimination against LGBTQ people in Colorado and another amendment stripping all future Colorado lawmakers of their most essential fiscal authority became law, this inauguration and the new straight Democratic control backing it up take on even more significance. From the Masterpiece Cakeshop court decision to the coming battles over spending priorities in Colorado, these are struggles that continue.

But Colorado has come a long way since that bad old days of 1992. We’re a “hate state” no longer.

8 Shares

3 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. Genghis says:

    But Colorado has come a long way since that bad old days of 1992. We’re a “hate state” no longer.

    This is generally accurate, but let's not forget that "The English language is the official language of the State of Colorado" is still enshrined in our state constitution. That being true, "We’re a 'hate state' no longer" seems a bit overbroad. Best to recognize that a state is just an aggregation of citizens (and no, the whole is not greater than, or even different from, the sum of its parts).

    Thankfully, it appears that there substantially fewer hateful component parts now than there were back when (the "good old days" is, as always, a myth). And thanks to recent developments in Colorado law, it is less likely that overt bigotry will attain the level of organic law in this state every time the wingnut wind blows.

    • Diogenesdemar says:

      An “official language,” or “official languages,” is simply a legal declaration of the language(s) required  to be used for official communications from the State.  Without such, a State that didn’t publish in the untold multitude of languages of its citizenry could be liable for discrimination.  That doesn’t mean that a State can’t publish, as a convenience, in more than one language — but, it still has the requirement to publish its legally required official publications in at least its official language(s).

      What it is not, is an official declaration of the language(s) that the citizenry is permitted to, or should, use.

      I agree that that “hate state” rhetoric was always overwrought (almost as much as the now we’re a “great state” pronouncement is).

  2. Genghis says:

    An “official language,” or “official languages,” is simply a legal declaration of the language(s) required  to be used for official communications from the State.  Without such, a State that didn’t publish in the untold multitude of languages of its citizenry could be liable for discrimination.  That doesn’t mean that a State can’t publish, as a convenience, in more than one language — but, it still has the requirement to publish its legally required official publications in at least its official language(s).

    lol

    Yeah, that's the same swill proffered in support of that abomination of an amendment back in 1988, pretty much verbatim. It was bullshit then, and it hasn't improved with age.

Leave a Reply

Comment from your Facebook account


You may comment with your Colorado Pols account above (click here to register), or via Facebook below.