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July 29, 2017 05:46 PM UTC

Here are two Colorado Republicans who are really angry at the GOP failure on healthcare

  • 7 Comments
  • by: Jason Salzman

(Promoted by Colorado Pols)

Anil Mathai, the Chair of the Adams County Republican Party, has been voicing his frustration and anger over the failure of Republicans to kill Obamacare.

In a strident Facebook post this week, Mathai wrote:

Mathai: Our continued failure [to repeal Obamacare] will end the Republican Party via huge losses in 2017 and 2018. We were trusted and elected to lead our nation successfully.

Written before the GOP repeal effort went down in flames, Mathai’s post stated:

Mathai: May the Republican Party immediately repeal Obamacare and return our nation to complete freedom and away from the tyranny that the Democrat communist party has enacted over the last eight years!

Mathai doesn’t hold back when speaking his mind, both about his fellow Republicans and about issues he cares about.

Last year, he seethed at “cowardly traitors known as ‘Republicans,” and he wrote that taking down confederate flag is bowing to “leftist, racist political correctness.”

There may be no one more angry at the Republican failure to replace Obamacare than Kelly Couey, who appeared in an I-Am-Created-Equal video prior to the 2014 election criticizing Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet for his support of Obamacare.

Couey wrote on Facebook after the vote: “Did any of these assholes who voted against repeal read the Constitution? The Ten Commandments? Sorry John McCain, the cancer in your head is not as bad as the poison in your corporate bought out black heart.”

Couey’s son has autism, and he and his wife have struggled with healthcare costs.  In his ad, which attacks Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet’s support for Obamcare, Couey complains about the cost of insurance under Obamacare. But all GOP bills to replace Obamacare would have resulted in higher premiums than what’s projected under current law.

Comments

7 thoughts on “Here are two Colorado Republicans who are really angry at the GOP failure on healthcare

  1. That is the sad irony- all of these folks complaining about Obamacare premium increases would have paid much more if the repeal efforts had worked. They'll still pay more with the Rubio / GOP efforts to sabotage anddefund the ACA "risk corridors" that weakened Obamacare.

    Yesterday, I heard Ken Buck state a bald-faced lie – he said in a public forum that when he was elected to Congress, that Obamacare would have made his family premiium $1800, whereas his wife's private insurance was $180. That was certainly not true, but it's equivalent to Cory Gardner's same lie about the ACA insurance costs.

    Their lying and cruel legislating will cost them, as well as the rest of us, big time.

  2. Anil Mathai proves that consistency is part of life. When I moved to Colorado in spring, 1981, I immediately noticed the corruption and stupidity endemic to Adams County politics. 36+ years later, nothing has changed. I guess that Mr. Mathai wants people to have the freedom to die in peace without the hassle of health care. He doesn’t seem even interested in fixing the current health care problems, within and without O-Care.

    As for Kelly Couey, he himself needs to read Article VI of the Constitution in regard to religious tests to run for office.

  3. So prior to last Friday morning's Senate vote, Anal Mathai was going off about his disappointment with the GOP for failing to free us from the tyranny which the "Democrat [sic] communist party" inflicted upon us.

    I'll bet he was even less happy after John McCain gave his thumb-down sign.  smiley

  4. This article at Huffpost explains modern day Republican Radicalism and should be a welcome read for most 'round here – especially the proprietors.

    To most Americans, “conservative” is interchangeable with “Republican Party.” After all, the GOP has usually been the more conservative side of a two-party system for a century. We also tend to understand who a conservative is based on the root of the word: someone who is cautious and respects the status quo, or, put more strongly, someone who is resistant to change.

    But the term has philosophical roots, too, separate from the party. Political parties are fundraising organizations attached to a policy platform. Over time, platforms change. The Republican Party has been around more than 160 years and has changed directions many times, as has the Democratic Party. At its founding, the GOP was abolitionist (a radical position at the time), pro-Union (that is, for “big” government over states’ rights) and for the expansion of individual rights. The GOP became firmly conservative only in the 20th century.

    From a European perspective, however, both U.S. parties have been conservative since World War II (that is, both are on the right end of the spectrum of most modern parliamentary democracies), and at the same time, both parties have always been liberal, as inheritors of Enlightenment notions of citizens’ rights, individual liberty and representative government.

    But gradual shifts in the GOP over the last two or three decades that culminated in Donald Trump’s election in 2016 have changed all that. The GOP is no longer a conservative party in any meaningful way. It is instead something else, and it needs a more accurate description.

    Why should we care what European political philosophy has to say about U.S. politics? Because our politics arose out of that philosophy, and going back to those roots brings clarity.

    Oh, and they should forward it on to our Dear Michael Bennet, Senator for Life.

    1. Zappy,

      I read the piece last night and it's excellent in tracing freaky lifespan of the American GOP. But how you could take one sentence out of a long essay and turn it into a diatribe on Bennet is really a cheap stunt. Lazy, too.

      In the meantime, you might consider moving to France. Perhaps you can find a lefty party extreme enough for you.

       

    1. Better bet, Secretary Zinke, like his boss (and probably the rest of the White House Circus Troupe), simply never knew . . . 

      " . . . Most people don't. Did you know failing congress controls the money? — that's just crazy! Sad. Real Republicans must change things now!"

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