PPP: Trump, Trumpcare, Gardner Circle The Drain

Alvina Vasquez writing at the Huffington Post on a new Public Policy Polling survey of Colorado voters, with numbers that should make even the most indestructibly overconfident Cory Gardner smile fade to nervousness:

Public Policy Polling conducted 3 polls on the Senate’s health care repeal in states of 3 Senators up for re-election in 2020 – Colorado, North Carolina and Iowa…

Despite the varying situations in each state, one thing is clear from the polling: voters overwhelmingly reject the Senate’s health care repeal legislation — by nearly 2-to-1 margin or more in each state.

COLORADO. Voters disapprove of health care repeal by 33 points (26%-59%) and that expands to 45 points among Independents (21%-66%). In fact, the bill only reaches 50% with Republicans.

…Voters want Congress to move on. Even in states that Trump won or places where the incumbent Senator is ahead in re-election, by double-digit margins, voters in all three states want their Senator to return to Washington after this recess and work to fix the Affordable Care Act rather than continue trying to repeal it.

COLORADO. By 23 points (59%-36%) voters want to fix instead of repeal, expanding to 34 points among Independents (64%-30%).

Looking at the full survey from PPP, we see President Donald Trump’s approval holding steady at around 40%, roughly consistent with his numbers relative to a common baseline from other recent polling in our state. In this poll the big move is against Gardner, who nets a shockingly low 27% approval–only getting to 50% with self-identified Trump voters, and distantly underwater with everyone else. We’d like to see additional corroboration, but if accurate these numbers represent the biggest crisis of Gardner’s political career so far.

It’s obvious that the ongoing campaign by Republicans to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which has surged to its highest level of support since passage while under threat of repeal, has seriously damaged Gardner’s approval in Colorado. But it’s more than just alienation of the law’s supporters showing up in these numbers. To get to only 27% approval, Gardner has to be bleeding support from the right as well–in all likelihood over the same chaos on health reform that’s outraging the left. Gardner has promised both to protect the people who have benefited from Obamacare and to destroy Obamacare, and the GOP’s present inability to do either of those things leaves Gardner with no way to make anyone happy. And that, in short, is how Gardner drops from 37% to 27% approval in two months.

All of which could have been, and indeed was, predicted. Gardner made the repeal of Obamacare the centerpiece of his political platform, and won votes with the promise to both do away with what he claimed was broken and to provide something better.

Now, the failure to accomplish either goal is all Gardner has to talk about.

23 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. unnamed says:

    Wonder what Gardner's resident ass kisser Moldy thinks of that. Not everything Cory Gardner does is evil.

     

    Also give me my ACA article little turd.

    • ModeratusModeratus says:

      This is a left wing pollster. I'll admit the repeal of Obamacare has caused some temporary problems, largely because Democrats have terrorized their base into believe that Republicans want to kill them. Once the repeal is done and Coloradans realize that Democrats were lying to them the whole time, these numbers will right themselves.

      The world was not ending before Obamacare, and it won't end after Obamacare is history. Time will tell and I am not worried.

      • unnamed says:

        Republicans do want to kill them.  That's not fear.  That's the truth.

        If repeal happens, and people lose their coverage, they will blame you.

         

        If you think things were just great before ACA and getting kicked off insurance for preexisting conditions is just fine, you and your ilk, including Cory Gardner want to kill people, or are fine with people dying of diseases when they can be saved.

        Cory Gardner is on the death panel.  He doesn't want to answer for the blood on his hands.

        And on yours Moldy.

      • notaskinnycooknotaskinnycook says:

        Moddy, Republicans working for the repeal of the ACA do want to kill people. Old, sick, pre-ACA uninsurable people. The Democrats aren't the liars; Republicans are. And maybe your world won't end without the ACA, but plenty of other people's will without medical care they will no longer be able to afford.

      • buford2 says:

         

        listen here you right wing motherfucker…MY DAUGHTER IS DEAD BECAUSE OF THE REPUBLICAN POLICIES PRE-OBAMACARE…so go fuck yourself…

      • OrangeFreeOrangeFree says:

        COLORADO. Voters disapprove of health care repeal by 33 points (26%-59%) and that expands to 45 points among Independents (21%-66%). In fact, the bill only reaches 50% with Republicans.

        COLORADO. By 23 points (59%-36%) voters want to fix instead of repeal, expanding to 34 points among Independents (64%-30%).

        Moderatus – you don't get those kinds of numbers if only the Democratic Party base is "terrorized." The Senate AND the House bills are bad bills. They strip health coverage from 22 million people, and they will make insurance much mroe expensive to purchase by keeping the good parts of the ACA – with bad "fixes" – while removing the unpopular parts, which just so happen to be the parts that pay for and reduce the costs of the good parts. 

        But you're right – the world didn't end before the ACA, and the world won't end if the ACA is repealed. But guess what: the world didn't end WITH the ACA either, as you and your fellow Conservatives predicted. Were things the best? No. But they were much better than the previous system. And face facts – people will die if they can't afford to go to the doctor. Insurance costs will go back to skyrocketing if people are forced to once again use the emergency room as their only means of being able to afford going to a hospital.  

        That will be on every member of Congress who votes for these bills, and everyone who voted for them. I'm sure you're fine with that. But you shouldn't be. 

  2. Duke CoxDuke Cox says:

    these numbers will right themselves. 

     

    Yeah…especially if you mix a little unicorn shit in with the potting soil when you plant them.     You really must be the lamest algorithm ever programmed.

    • ParkHill says:

      Just another Dunning-Kruger Turing Machine

      • Duke CoxDuke Cox says:

        I looked into it and found an explanation for why Fluffy thinks Trump is God.

        This is right…isn't it Fluffy?

         

        The tautology presented in the opening summary, along with the equally tautological neuroscience (exaggerated Haynes and Libet Studies)¹ of observing the brain to conduct activity prior to human perception of its cognitive selection processes, is central behind the idea that consciousness, self, free will and Shermer’s Free Won’t, are all artifices we perceive from an illusion of neurofunction.² The illusion of self governance is substantiated in essence upon solely the neural duality of M+n neuron bundles observing M neuron bundle functions, and continuing so forth.  This plausible propter hoc ergo hoc solus argument (I can conceive of the human brain constituting a Turing Sufficiency, therefore it is proved to be a Turing Sufficiency) stands as the litmus test of belief in religious Nihilism. And it hinges solely on what we define and perceive to be the existence of, free will/Free Will. And not simply human free will, but Free Will itself. 

        Don't I remember you saying this for a long time now?

  3. JohnInDenver says:

    A single poll 3.5 years before his next election does not create a "crisis" for Gardner's political career. As charmed as he has been and as much time as there is between now and then, it is entirely possible his wishy washy stance(s) on healthcare repeal / replace / reform / reinvention won't be the centerpiece of the campaign.

Leave a Reply

Comment from your Facebook account


You may comment with your Colorado Pols account above (click here to register), or via Facebook below.