Environmentalists Ramp Up Attack on Musgrave

As the Fort Collins Coloradoan reports:

A national environmental group launched a new $175,000 advertising campaign Monday attacking Rep. Marilyn Musgrave, R-Fort Morgan.

With the latest campaign, Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund has spent more than $400,000 in just over a month targeting the three-term incumbent.

The new TV and radio spots once again criticize Musgrave for voting against several measures that would have raised the corporate annual fuel economy standards placed on auto manufacturers.

Musgrave’s campaign manager, Jason Thielman, accused the environmental group of “falsehoods and lies.”

“Marilyn Musgrave’s votes on vehicle fuel efficiency standards cost her constituents money,” said Rodger Schlickeisen, president of Defenders of Wildlife Action Fund…

In a new line of attack, the latest ad also criticizes Musgrave for being among 34 House members to vote against a 2006 Republican-sponsored bill that would have criminalized gasoline price gouging. The bill passed the House but died in the Senate.

Markey spokesman Ben Marter declined comment on the ad because the Markey campaign wasn’t involved in its production. By law, political campaigns and independent committees cannot coordinate efforts.

The cost of energy has become a significant campaign issue nationally, and Colorado’s 4th Congressional District is no exception.

15 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. Froward69 says:

    I cannot believe how the republicans are gaining traction with the domestic drilling issue. it will do nothing to reduce prices at the pump. as that oil goes on the world market before it goes through the refinery. The Oil companies will not ramp up supply as more supply will curb their current profits. the republicans know this and are relying on the public’s ignorance.

    past votes like musgraves and schaffers are to blame for high gas prices. yet they are getting traction with their line of bull. republicans certainly are not about changing the status quo.  

    • Sir Robin says:

      and pulling the wool over the eyes of less informed Americans, they’re all for it.

    • One Queer Dude says:

      It doesn’t matter.  When people desperate, they’ll believe anything they’re told.

    • Oil prices may be largely fungible on the world market, but individual oil fields tend to feed specific markets.

      We ship much of the Alaskan oil overseas, keep Gulf oil here, and accept oil from several overseas fields.  Each oil field has its own mineral characteristics, and refineries must be tuned to those characteristics for optimum efficiency and quality product production.

  2. RedGreen says:

    From the few news reports and the discussion on Pols, it sounds like Musgrave is solidly on the ropes. I’d be curious to hear from anyone in the district — is this an accurate impression, or are regular voters paying much attention yet?  

  3. One Queer Dude says:

       Is there a single voter in CD 4 facing the possibility of foreclosure who would even think about voting for her?

  4. ajb says:

    In the debate over what to do about high gas prices, Democtrats need to hammer republicans over past votes that exacerbated the current problem. The only Republican attack is over supply – the the Dems didn’t do enough to increase supply (which is a truly specious argument).

    Dems on the other hand, can go after every R vote against conservation (including CAFE standards) and alternative energy. There’s a treasure trove of votes there that can be mined. That’s what this ad does. I think the imagery is weak – could have used something like rising waters that eventually leaves you underwater at the end (and maybe a neat little tie in to Katrina there).

     

  5. billkraich says:

    What do fuel milage standards in 2020 have to with gas prices in 2008? – Not Much

    What do fuel milage standards in 2020 have to with gas prices in 2020? – Not much

    What does off shore drilling have to do with gas prices in 2008?  – Not Much

    What does off-shore drilling have to do with gas prices in 2020?  Alot.  If Im still payin $4/gallon in 2020, I’ll be a happy camper, If Im payin $10 a gallon in 2020, I voted for Marky

    • You only wish they’d still be $4/gal. in 2020.  You’ll be lucky if they’re $4/liter.

      And, actually, fuel mileage standards in 2012 have a lot to do with gas prices in 2020.  Efficiency gains offset supply losses to some extent, and they’re attainable.

      • billkraich says:

        Efficiency gains will be atainable if they cut demand at the same rate or higher rate than the rate demand will grow as more and more americans hit the road.

        Mileage standards apply to every car made, not on the road by 2012 (I think the date is 2020 though).  The new cars will be high mileage, but not every car out there will be up to the same standard.

        Increase our supply, and presto – lower prices or at the very least stable prices.

        • ajb says:

          If you search way back to the last oil shock in the late 70’s, oil prices eventually fell due to falling demand, not increased supply. In fact, the amount of oil consumed in this country did not exceed 1980 levels until the late 1990s (I think it was 1998). Increased drilling and new discoveries at this point only offset declining production in existing oil fields. The easiest way to alter the supply-demand equation is to reduce demand. It costs less and it happens faster. Republicans have been stone-walling efforts to decrease demand forever. It violates their notions of choice and free markets. Now we’re paying the price and the Republican response is to dig a deeper hole. Well, now it’s time to make a big deal out of those past votes to stonewall energy conservation (so patronizingly dismissed by Dick Cheney). We had 20 years to get our energy act together when oil was cheap. Had we acted, energy would still be cheap and we wouldn’t be having this conversation. So yeah, every vote regarding energy efficiency and alternative energy should be scrutinized and publicized and made into a campaign ad.

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