President (To Win Colorado) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Biden*

(R) Donald Trump

80%

20%

CO-01 (Denver) See Full Big Line

(D) Diana DeGette*

(R) V. Archuleta

98%

2%

CO-02 (Boulder-ish) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Neguse*

(R) Marshall Dawson

95%

5%

CO-03 (West & Southern CO) See Full Big Line

(D) Adam Frisch

(R) Jeff Hurd

50%

50%

CO-04 (Northeast-ish Colorado) See Full Big Line

(R) Lauren Boebert

(D) Trisha Calvarese

90%

10%

CO-05 (Colorado Springs) See Full Big Line

(R) Jeff Crank

(D) River Gassen

80%

20%

CO-06 (Aurora) See Full Big Line

(D) Jason Crow*

(R) John Fabbricatore

90%

10%

CO-07 (Jefferson County) See Full Big Line

(D) B. Pettersen

(R) Sergei Matveyuk

90%

10%

CO-08 (Northern Colo.) See Full Big Line

(D) Yadira Caraveo

(R) Gabe Evans

70%

30%

State Senate Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

80%

20%

State House Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

95%

5%

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
April 28, 2008 08:17 PM UTC

Colorado Higher Ed Funding Not So Good

  • 4 Comments
  • by: Colorado Pols

As the Rocky Mountain News reports:

The budget problem has reached a “breaking point,” said Richard Schweigert, chief financial officer for Colorado State University. “Higher ed’s been saying now literally for about eight or nine years: ‘Look, you’re falling behind with us, and you’re starting to affect quality.’

“I think now that is clearly demonstrable to anybody who looks at it.”…

…The state has partially restored funding to higher education since Referendum C passed in 2005. Ref C allows the state to keep revenue for five years that otherwise would go back to taxpayers under the Taxpayer’s Bill of Rights.

The state budget has allocated an additional $52 million for college operating costs next year, for a total of $680 million.

Lawmakers, with Ritter’s support, also have introduced Senate Bill 218, which would tap tax revenue from oil and gas extraction on federal lands in Colorado to help finance renovations and new construction on campuses.

That could bring colleges and universities hundreds of millions of dollars, enough money to finish the Auraria science building, among other projects. But the revenue stream could be lower if drilling does not occur on the Roan Plateau as expected.

“It is the best chance we’ve had in a long time to get well,” said David Skaggs, executive director of the state Department of Higher Education.

Robert Moore, vice president for budget and finance at CU, said state leaders are recognizing “that there is a true problem.”

“For years there was talk, and now there’s some action,” he said.

Comments

4 thoughts on “Colorado Higher Ed Funding Not So Good

  1. Don’t expect funding for higher to get any better with radical right wingers like Cory Garnder running around claiming it’s nothing more than a “pet project.”

    Gardner and his ilk will throw Colorado University’s under the bus any day of the week to protect their big money funders like Big Oil.  

    1. That Rep. C Gardner is one of two sponsors of a ballot initiative filed Friday to put the severance tax money into a permanent fund for higher education – the other sponsor is Sen. Josh Penry. Doesn’t sound like he’s being such a good friend of Big Oil to me.

Leave a Comment

Recent Comments


Posts about

Donald Trump
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Lauren Boebert
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Yadira Caraveo
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado House
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado Senate
SEE MORE

61 readers online now

Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter to stay in the loop with regular updates!