President (To Win Colorado) See Full Big Line

(D) Kamala Harris

(R) Donald Trump

80%

20%

CO-01 (Denver) See Full Big Line

(D) Diana DeGette*

(R) V. Archuleta

98%

2%

CO-02 (Boulder-ish) See Full Big Line

(D) Joe Neguse*

(R) Marshall Dawson

95%

5%

CO-03 (West & Southern CO) See Full Big Line

(D) Adam Frisch

(R) Jeff Hurd

50%

50%

CO-04 (Northeast-ish Colorado) See Full Big Line

(R) Lauren Boebert

(D) Trisha Calvarese

90%

10%

CO-05 (Colorado Springs) See Full Big Line

(R) Jeff Crank

(D) River Gassen

80%

20%

CO-06 (Aurora) See Full Big Line

(D) Jason Crow*

(R) John Fabbricatore

90%

10%

CO-07 (Jefferson County) See Full Big Line

(D) B. Pettersen

(R) Sergei Matveyuk

90%

10%

CO-08 (Northern Colo.) See Full Big Line

(D) Yadira Caraveo

(R) Gabe Evans

70%↑

30%

State Senate Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

80%

20%

State House Majority See Full Big Line

DEMOCRATS

REPUBLICANS

95%

5%

Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
November 21, 2007 07:59 PM UTC

President Bush stalls bipartisan legislation

  • 0 Comments
  • by: John Galt

Despite bipartisan efforts, by Senator Salazar, Senator Allard and the M & M connection of Congressman Mark Udall and Congresswoman Marilyn Musgrave, President Bush and the U.S. Park Service continue to halt the process of turning Rocky Mountain National Park into a wilderness area.

This bill represents years of work from the offices of Salazar, Allard, Musgrave and Udall. It is unfortunate that when our elected officials not only work hard on a bill, but more importantly work together for a compromise that helps all Coloradans, that their work would be hampered by our President.

Musgrave 2.0 sent a letter to President Bush and U.S. Interior Secretary Dick Kempthorne urging them to stop holding up this bipartisan bill. My assumption is that similar letters will be coming from Udall, Salazar and Allard in the near future.

Read more from the Coloradoan after the jump.

From the Fort Collins Coloradoan

Wilderness designation still in limbo
Colorado delegation agrees on RMNP item; federal government should move ahead, too

After more than three decades of waiting, yet another bureaucratic holdup has left the wilderness designation for Rocky Mountain National Park in limbo.

The U.S. Park Service and Bush administration are dragging their feet on the designation over concerns about reducing liability of the Fort Collins-based Water Supply and Storage Co., which owns the Grand River Ditch located in the park. Federal officials want to make sure that the company is legally responsible for damage to the park should a breach occur in the ditch. Meantime, local ranching and farming representatives said they will not support the bill unless the company is at least partially protected from future lawsuits.

Negotiations between Park Service officials and the ditch company have been ongoing for nearly two years. A Senate committee heard testimony on the topic in July but has taken no action.

Hoping to jumpstart the process, U.S. Rep. Marilyn Musgrave, R-4th Congressional District, wrote an appropriately strong letter urging Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne to get on board with bipartisan legislation to designate 249,300 acres of RMNP as wilderness.

And just last week, U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar, a Democrat, testified in front of the House Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands hearing on H.R. 2334, which outlines the designation. U.S. Sen. Wayne Allard, a Republican, is the Senate co-sponsor with Salazar, and U.S. Rep. Mark Udall, a Democrat, is the House co-sponsor with Musgrave.

With a representative of the ditch company at his side, Salazar noted that the issue of liability for the ditch company already is outlined in the legislation. He told the committee, “The language we have added would make the liability standard under which the ditch operates consistent with the standard that applies to other water users under Colorado law. This revised standard only applies, however, if the ditch is operated in accordance with an updated operations and maintenance plan approved by the Park Service. It is a sensible provision.”

Last May, the Colorado delegation showed welcome bipartisanship in agreeing upon this legislation that protects the park, water users, recreationists and wildlife. Nearby communities have offered their whole-hearted support for the designation, first proposed by President Nixon in 1974.

The Park Service should acknowledge this local and legislative support. Coloradans appear to have ironed out differences here; the federal government should follow.

>

Comments

Leave a Comment

Recent Comments


Posts about

Donald Trump
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Lauren Boebert
SEE MORE

Posts about

Rep. Yadira Caraveo
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado House
SEE MORE

Posts about

Colorado Senate
SEE MORE

70 readers online now

Newsletter

Subscribe to our monthly newsletter to stay in the loop with regular updates!