Wednesday Open Thread

“I personally think we developed language because of our deep need to complain.”

–Lily Tomlin

26 Community Comments, Facebook Comments

  1. Duke Cox says:

    I wonder if Tina enjoyed her breakfast yesterday morning? 😆

  2. davebarnes says:

    November 17, 1858 – The city of 1858 – The city of Denver, Colorado is founded.

  3. MichaelBowman says:

    Manchin may need to find a new talking point? 
     

    Rating agencies say Biden's spending plans will not add to inflationary pressure

    U.S. President Joe Biden's infrastructure and social spending legislation will not add to inflationary pressures in the U.S. economy, economists and analysts in leading rating agencies told Reuters on Tuesday.

    • Duke Cox says:

      I hope Manchins' behavior and phony righteousness comes back to bite him in the ass. 

      • MichaelBowman says:

        Manchin might want to chew on this one: 

        The middle 60% now own less wealth than the top 1%. 

        • In 1989, the American middle class claimed 36% of the nation’s wealth. The top 1% owned less than double that share: 17%.
           
        • The middle class’s share has steadily declined since then, while that of the super-rich has skyrocketed.
           
        • This year, for the first time ever, the top 1% owns a greater share of U.S. wealth than the middle 60%.

         

  4. 2Jung2Die says:

    Low bar maybe, but looks like Colorado's Independent Redistricting Commission might have done better than the Washington (state) bipartisan commission, which failed to produce maps by deadline and had to punt to the state's Supreme Court. Can't imagine the fun involved in running a R vs. D bipartisan commission in this era!

  5. NOV GOP meltdown says:

    The "Shaman" is heading from moms basement to the pokey. On ice for 41 months.  Plenty of time to reflect about how much of a loser you have been. 

  6. MichaelBowman says:

    The plight of small Colorado farms makes news in the latest edition of National Geographic

    Small farms battle speculators over centuries-old water rights in drought-stricken Colorado

    The centuries-old irrigation system sustains a unique and ancient culture that today faces unprecedented threats. Rising temperatures, declining snowpack, and record drought attributed to climate change dried up some acequias, forcing families to fallow fields and sell cattle. Extremes in weather in this Massachusetts-sized area are bringing farmers to their knees like nearly no place else in the United States. 

     

     

  7. itlduso says:

    Hickenlooper was just asked during his virtual town hall meeting what he would do to pass the John Lewis voting rights bills.  He said he was trying to get 60 votes.  OMG.  This contradicts what he said in an earlier town hall meeting where he committed to carving out the filibuster rules to vote for this legislation.  What a slime ball. 

    BTW – When is he going to hold a real town hall meeting where people can respond to bullshit answers like he just gave.

    • Duke Cox says:

      Giddy up!

      🙄

      • itlduso says:

        This is what I reported he said at his 8/30/21 town hall meeting:

        After a whole bunch of "bipartisan" blah, blah, the money quote is that if they can't get 60 votes, then he'll support changing the filibuster rules in a carve out fashion. 

        To get to that conclusion, he cites:

        –"Troubling" transparent attempt by GOP state legislatures to disenfranchise Democratic voters.

        –Never before seen in his lifetime the scale of this attempt to alter the fundamental bedrock of our democracy.

        –We have to listen to GOP position because the CO voter laws, which are a model for the nation, were passed with bipartisan support so it should be possible for Congress.  {He said: Why not have mail-in ballots across the country with the government paying for the postage?}

        –But, if they can't get 60 votes for reasonable legislation, then "we should probably do it" (i.e., change the filibuster rules).  And, this will be front and center when they return to Congress.

        So, as Michael Bennet told me a couple of weeks ago, Hick is cagey but will eventually support a carve out of the filibuster rules to pass voting rights legislation.

        Phew!

        Tonight, he said none of that.  Instead, he just said he was "working hard" to get 60 votes.  Period.  And, of course, there was no way for anyone to ask a follow-up.  And, also of course, there is no way there will be 10 GOP votes for the legislation.

        Let's be clear about what's at stake.  Even more than the voter suppression measures being passed in GOP states, the more insidious laws allow GOP state legislatures to nullify the vote totals for federal elections and decide for themselves who won the election.  Those are the same GOP legislatures that still believe Trump won the election.  Hick will be a permanent minority Senator in a country that makes the House and the Senate moot; i.e., the end of American democracy.  What a f*ing moron.

         

        • kwtree says:

          That's Hick, doing the "Try to please all, but please none" shuffle.   And then there's "Float the hypothetical as the unattainable ideal to show that your heart's in the right place." Also, "Say many words that mean very little".

          But frankly, he's still not in his predecessor Cory Gardner's league on that one.

          • itlduso says:

            Of course he is not like Cory Gardner.  But, and this is huge, on the existential topic of voting rights, he is apparently no different if he allows the GOP to filibuster this legislation.  In France, they would label him a collaborator.

             

        • Conserv. Head Banger says:

          Be careful what you wish for. What’s really at stake, if the filibuster goes away, is the ability to stop all sorts of Trump-inspired legislation if the Republicans take back the Senate next year.

          What goes on in states like Georgia, Texas, and others, with their ugly voter suppression efforts, have to be decided by people in those states.

          Many Republican legislators likely have potential scandalous behavior that is hidden. Some really good investigative reporting could bring those out. Remember Roy Moore in the Alabama senatorial election?

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